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Module 2: Recognizing and Avoiding Unsafe Conditions Copy

August 31, 2021

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Your surroundings can also be hazardous when operating an aerial lift. Overhead hazards can especially be troublesome.

  • If you are working indoors, you need to be aware of beams, rafters, and ceiling heights.
  • And, keep your eyes open for HVAC ducts, piping, or cable railways as well.

Before you use an aerial lift you want to make sure it’s in good working order and there are no problems with the area where you will be set up.[/vc_column_text][ultimate_heading main_heading=”Hazards Most Often Associated with Aerial Lift Work” heading_tag=”h3″ main_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:regular” main_heading_style=”font-weight:normal;font-style:normal;” sub_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto” margin_design_tab_text=””][/ultimate_heading][vc_column_text]Fall from elevated level[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image=”17096″ img_size=”full”][vc_column_text]Anyone working on an aerial work platform must be anchored to either the basket or bucket in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications and instructions. Anchoring to the boom can only be used when allowed by the manufacturer and permitted by the Competent Person).

If lanyards are to be used, they must be sufficiently short to prohibit the worker from climbing out of basket.

Lanyards with that have built-in shock absorbers can be used by Self-retracting devices cannot be used. Neither is tying off to an adjacent pole or structure unless a safe device for 100% tie-off is used for the transfer.

Working over water

When working from an aerial lift directly over water AND the depth of the water is at least 10 ft deep, fall protection won’t be required, however Personal Flotation Devices will be required.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image=”17097″ img_size=”full”][vc_column_text]You will always attach the fall protection equipment to a boom or bucket and never to an adjacent beam or structure. If you do, you could find yourself pulled from the lift and left hanging if the lift moves or tips.

Activity Hazard Analysis

Names of Competent Person for fall protection, QP for aerial lifts, and the controls used to eliminate falls will need to be included in the AHA for the Definable Feature(s) of work where an aerial lift is used. We’ve included a blank AHA in the course materials. Consider all hazards associated with the particular DFOW and make sure they are all addresses in the AHA and in the Fall Protection Plan located in the project’s Accident Prevention Plan.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]Objects falling from lifts –  Be mindful of others working near the lift you’re on

  • Falling objects can be a hazard when you are using an aerial lift. Even if you’re careful, tools or materials can sometimes fall off the platform.
  • Protect people who are working around the lift by marking off the area with safety cones or tape.
  • If workers must be on the ground while a lift is being used, make sure they’re wearing hard hats.

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]Objects falling from lifts –  Be mindful of others working near the lift you’re on

  • Falling objects can be a hazard when you are using an aerial lift. Even if you’re careful, tools or materials can sometimes fall off the platform.
  • Protect people who are working around the lift by marking off the area with safety cones or tape.
  • If workers must be on the ground while a lift is being used, make sure they’re wearing hard hats.

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]Tip Overs

A serious hazard you want to avoid at all costs is tipping. Tipping can occur if a lift has been overloaded or isn’t properly stabilized. Aerial lift tip-overs most often occur when a bucket cable or boom breaks. They can also happen when a bucket falls, or a scissor lift tips over. To avoid these manlift accidents, workers should never:

  • Set up an aerial lift between overhead hazards
  • Exceed load capacity limits
  • Travel to a job site with an elevated lift
  • Use a lift on uneven terrain, or
  • Raise a platform in windy conditions

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]Tip Overs

A serious hazard you want to avoid at all costs is tipping. Tipping can occur if a lift has been overloaded or isn’t properly stabilized. Aerial lift tip-overs most often occur when a bucket cable or boom breaks. They can also happen when a bucket falls, or a scissor lift tips over. To avoid these manlift accidents, workers should never:

  • Set up an aerial lift between overhead hazards
  • Exceed load capacity limits
  • Travel to a job site with an elevated lift
  • Use a lift on uneven terrain, or
  • Raise a platform in windy conditions

[/vc_column_text][vc_video link=”http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HOxcYzgIu3o”][vc_column_text]Some ways to avoid the chances of tipping are:

  • Be sure to take into account your own weight plus the weight of other tools and equipment you will have with you.
  • Proper placement of the lift will also help to avoid a tip over.
  • If your lift is equipped with outriggers, use them, and make sure they’re set up on stable ground.

Ejections from the lift platform

Ejections can lead to serious injury and death. Most often ejections happen if the bucket or platform makes hits an object forcefully if a falling object hits workers on the platform or from a sudden jerk on the lift causing workers to lose their balance.

To help avoid accidents like ejections, make sure the outriggers are set on level ground or pads. The operator must check the lift brakes and ensure they are set. Wheel chocks must be used on sloping surfaces, if safe to do so and warning signs must be placed around the work zone. Finally, operating the lift according to the manufacturer’s guidelines can also help.

Structural failures (collapses)

Before an aerial lift can be used safely it must be in safe condition. That is the purpose of a pre-use inspection: to detect defects or damage that could impair the functioning of the machine or the operator’s familiarity with the controls.

If a defect is detected during the pre-use inspection, the machine must be clearly tagged out of service until it is repaired.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image=”17098″ img_size=”full”][vc_column_text]If you’re outdoors, you want to pay attention to trees and light poles. Stay a minimum of ten feet away any of these hazards.

High voltage powerlines can be extremely dangerous and have their own set of rules based on the amount of electricity that they’re carrying.

If possible, the line should be deenergized. If it’s not possible to deenergize the lines, you should stay as far away from them as possible.

In fact, OSHA says if you’re not a qualified electrical worker, you and any conductive objects that you’re holding should not come within ten feet of a line carrying fifty thousand volts.  For higher voltage line you must stay even further away.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]Entanglement hazards

Keep hands, arms, and other body parts within the confines of the platform and guard rail while working on the platform. Keep hands and fingers away from moving parts while on the ground.

Avoid loose clothing that could become caught in chains, pulleys, lifts, etc. If your hair is long, tie it up. Always ensure that the machine is de-energized before conducting maintenance and repairs.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][ultimate_heading main_heading=”Module 2 Quiz”]Time for the next short quiz. Click on the quiz link below to begin. A score of 70% or higher is required to pass. Once you are done, you will be taken to the 3rd module. Good luck with the quiz and we’ll see you over in Module 3.[/ultimate_heading][/vc_column][/vc_row]