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MODULE 1: QUALITY CONTROL PLANNING

November 10, 2021

[vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1643750875051{border-top-width: 2px !important;border-right-width: 2px !important;border-bottom-width: 2px !important;border-left-width: 2px !important;border-left-color: #000000 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #000000 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #000000 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #000000 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;border-radius: 3px !important;}”][vc_column][vc_single_image image=”15634″ img_size=”full”][ultimate_heading heading_tag=”h1″ main_heading_color=”#1e73be” sub_heading_color=”#000000″ alignment=”left” main_heading_font_family=”font_family:Advent Pro|font_call:Advent+Pro” main_heading_style=”font-weight:700;” main_heading_font_size=”desktop:22px;” sub_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:300″ sub_heading_style=”font-weight:300;” sub_heading_font_size=”desktop:18px;” sub_heading_line_height=”desktop:20px;”]All Government contracts will require that each step of the Project Quality is guaranteed. This is done through Contractor Quality Control and is a job of the Construction Quality Control System Manager (CQC System Manager) to control and maintain quality throughout the life of the contract.

The Government side also has a quality process, and it’s called Quality Assurance (QA). The QA Officer monitors the contractor’s QC process to assure that it is viable and working.[/ultimate_heading][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1643750985245{border-top-width: 2px !important;border-right-width: 2px !important;border-bottom-width: 2px !important;border-left-width: 2px !important;background-color: rgba(255,255,255,0.64) !important;*background-color: rgb(255,255,255) !important;border-left-color: #000000 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #000000 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #000000 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #000000 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;border-radius: 3px !important;}”][vc_column][ultimate_heading main_heading=”QUALITY IN CONSTRUCTION” heading_tag=”h1″ main_heading_color=”#1e73be” sub_heading_color=”#595959″ alignment=”left” main_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:700″ main_heading_style=”font-weight:700;” main_heading_font_size=”desktop:22px;” sub_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:500″ sub_heading_style=”font-weight:500;” sub_heading_font_size=”desktop:16px;” sub_heading_line_height=”desktop:18px;”][/ultimate_heading][vc_column_text]”Quality” is defined as meeting the contract requirements outlined in the contract plans and specifications.

The QC process provides the contractor with a plan to follow, called the Project Quality Control Plan in an effort to aid and control the processes of the contract in order to achieve quality.

If these plans and processes are followed thoroughly, the contractor could not only see an increase in his or her bottom line, but the CPARS rating by the Government for the Contractor can most definitely help them win future contracts.

The items below should be completed in order to get the QC off to a good start on a project and start other important processes, like contractor payment.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][ultimate_heading main_heading=”Identify the Features of Work” main_heading_color=”#1e73be” sub_heading_color=”#595959″ alignment=”left” main_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:700″ main_heading_style=”font-weight:700;” main_heading_font_size=”desktop:22px;” sub_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:500″ sub_heading_style=”font-weight:500;” sub_heading_font_size=”desktop:16px;” sub_heading_line_height=”desktop:18px;”][/ultimate_heading][vc_single_image image=”18960″ img_size=”full” css=”.vc_custom_1636639722864{border-top-width: 2px !important;border-right-width: 2px !important;border-bottom-width: 2px !important;border-left-width: 2px !important;border-left-color: #000000 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #000000 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #000000 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #000000 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”][vc_column_text]Features of Work of a project are individual tasks of a project. Features of Work include such activities as “grubbing and clearing”, “underground piping”, “exterior electrical work”, and “project close-out” but these may not be sufficiently broken down for the QC process.

Each of these activities has sections such as “underground water”, “underground sewer”, “underground gas”, etc. for the overall activity of the “underground piping” example. To properly manage quality on a project, each activity must be broken down to very specific activities that are called features of work.

One factor when considering the features of work is Inspections. Each feature of work will require different Preparatory inspections and meetings.

SIDEBAR: To learn more about Preparatory Inspections, we’ve provided you with a free course called Three Phases of Control. You’ll find it in your account.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_empty_space][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row bg_type=”bg_color” css=”.vc_custom_1643749665771{background-color: rgba(160,173,186,0.64) !important;*background-color: rgb(160,173,186) !important;border-radius: 2px !important;}”][vc_column][ultimate_heading main_heading=”Definable Features of Work” heading_tag=”h1″ main_heading_color=”#1e73be” sub_heading_color=”#595959″ alignment=”left” main_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:700″ main_heading_style=”font-weight:700;” main_heading_font_size=”desktop:22px;” sub_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:500″ sub_heading_style=”font-weight:500;” sub_heading_font_size=”desktop:16px;” sub_heading_line_height=”desktop:18px;”][/ultimate_heading][vc_column_text]Definable Features of Work are worth mentioning here, mostly because they can be confusing.

US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and Naval Facilities (NAVFAC) explain Definable Features of Work as being:

“… a task which is separate and distinct from other tasks and has separate control requirements. As a minimum, each section of the specifications can be considered as a DFOW. However, there may be more than one definable feature under a section of the specifications. Masonry, landscape, plumbing, interior electrical, are examples.

Another definition of a DFOW is an activity in the project schedule that results in a physical product. The list shall be cross referenced to the contractor’s construction schedule and the specification sections.

For projects requiring a progress schedule, the list of DFOWs shall include, but not be limited to, all items of work on the schedule.

For projects requiring a network analysis schedule, the list of DFOWs shall include, but not be limited to, all critical path activities.”[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]Definable Features of Work are worth mentioning here, mostly because they can be confusing.

US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and Naval Facilities (NAVFAC) explain Definable Features of Work as being:

“… a task which is separate and distinct from other tasks and has separate control requirements. As a minimum, each section of the specifications can be considered as a DFOW. However, there may be more than one definable feature under a section of the specifications. Masonry, landscape, plumbing, interior electrical, are examples.

Another definition of a DFOW is an activity in the project schedule that results in a physical product. The list shall be cross referenced to the contractor’s construction schedule and the specification sections.

For projects requiring a progress schedule, the list of DFOWs shall include, but not be limited to, all items of work on the schedule.

For projects requiring a network analysis schedule, the list of DFOWs shall include, but not be limited to, all critical path activities.”[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][ultimate_heading heading_tag=”h1″ main_heading_color=”#1e73be” sub_heading_color=”#595959″ alignment=”left” main_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:700″ main_heading_style=”font-weight:700;” main_heading_font_size=”desktop:22px;” sub_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:500″ sub_heading_style=”font-weight:500;” sub_heading_font_size=”desktop:16px;” sub_heading_line_height=”desktop:18px;”]If you go back up to the Specifications we showed you above with the yellow highlighted Features of Work, we have more work to do. While the highlights showed the “Features of Work,” it did not show the Definable Features of Work.

Now what?[/ultimate_heading][vc_single_image image=”18962″ img_size=”full” css=”.vc_custom_1636645766468{border-top-width: 2px !important;border-right-width: 2px !important;border-bottom-width: 2px !important;border-left-width: 2px !important;border-left-color: #000000 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #000000 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #000000 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #000000 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”][ultimate_heading heading_tag=”h1″ main_heading_color=”#1e73be” sub_heading_color=”#595959″ alignment=”left” main_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:700″ main_heading_style=”font-weight:700;” main_heading_font_size=”desktop:22px;” sub_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:500″ sub_heading_style=”font-weight:500;” sub_heading_font_size=”desktop:16px;” sub_heading_line_height=”desktop:18px;”]We’ll just look at Division 31, which is Earthwork.

31 05 22 is Geotextiles used as Filters: We will need filter material (product) for this feature of work, as well as a subcontractor to perform the work. Therefore, Filter Material should be a DFOW.

31 11 00.00 11 is Clearing, Grubbing, and Striping. In addition to Clearing, Grubbing and Striping, we will need to install Silt Fences to follow the requirements of the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan. In order to do this, we will need a silt fence (product) and a Subcontractor to perform the work. Therefore, we will add “Stormwater Prevention-Silt Fence” as another DFOW in Division 31.

31 24 00.00 12 is Embankment. For the embankment work, we will also need to Establish New Turf. This will require seeding. In order to accomplish seeding we will need seed (product) and a subcontractor to perform the work. Therefore we will add Establishment of New Turf as a DFOW.

The good news is, it gets easier as you become more comfortable going through the specs, plans, and the project schedule.[/ultimate_heading][ultimate_heading main_heading=”2. Identify Contractor Personnel” main_heading_color=”#1e73be” sub_heading_color=”#595959″ alignment=”left” main_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:700″ main_heading_style=”font-weight:700;” main_heading_font_size=”desktop:22px;” sub_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:500″ sub_heading_style=”font-weight:500;” sub_heading_font_size=”desktop:16px;” sub_heading_line_height=”desktop:18px;”]Contractor and Subcontractor Staffing information is to be submitted 14 days from receipt of QCS Software.[/ultimate_heading][vc_single_image image=”16105″ img_size=”full” css=”.vc_custom_1636647333309{border-top-width: 2px !important;border-right-width: 2px !important;border-bottom-width: 2px !important;border-left-width: 2px !important;border-left-color: #000000 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #000000 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #000000 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #000000 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”][ultimate_heading main_heading=”3. Identify QC Requirements” main_heading_color=”#1e73be” sub_heading_color=”#595959″ alignment=”left” main_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:700″ main_heading_style=”font-weight:700;” main_heading_font_size=”desktop:22px;” sub_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:500″ sub_heading_style=”font-weight:500;” sub_heading_font_size=”desktop:16px;” sub_heading_line_height=”desktop:18px;”]QC Requirements include Tests, Schools, Installed and Transfer Property. QC Tests are defined in the Contract and are based on engineering and construction judgment as to the type and number of tests to be accomplished.

Schools represent the training or instruction the contractor must provide the customer on equipment or systems. Installed and Transfer Property are those items of equipment incorporated into the design of the facility or property that changes hands during the construction process.[/ultimate_heading][ultimate_heading main_heading=”4. Identify Submittal Requirements” main_heading_color=”#1e73be” sub_heading_color=”#595959″ alignment=”left” main_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:700″ main_heading_style=”font-weight:700;” main_heading_font_size=”desktop:22px;” sub_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:500″ sub_heading_style=”font-weight:500;” sub_heading_font_size=”desktop:16px;” sub_heading_line_height=”desktop:18px;”]The Contractor is required to furnish a specified quality of construction, including materials and equipment to be incorporated in the work. Control of the quality of materials and equipment require timely review, testing, or other evaluation.

All required submittals must be made in time to allow for evaluation, approval, procurement, and delivery prior to the preparatory control phase and before the item is needed in the construction process. The primary responsibility for the overall management and control of contractor submittals lies with the Prime Contractor.[/ultimate_heading][ultimate_heading main_heading=”5. Identify the Schedule (Pay) Activities” main_heading_color=”#1e73be” sub_heading_color=”#595959″ alignment=”left” main_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:700″ main_heading_style=”font-weight:700;” main_heading_font_size=”desktop:22px;” sub_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:500″ sub_heading_style=”font-weight:500;” sub_heading_font_size=”desktop:16px;” sub_heading_line_height=”desktop:18px;”][/ultimate_heading][vc_single_image image=”18963″ img_size=”full” css=”.vc_custom_1636647787783{border-top-width: 2px !important;border-right-width: 2px !important;border-bottom-width: 2px !important;border-left-width: 2px !important;border-left-color: #000000 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #000000 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #000000 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #000000 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}”][ultimate_heading main_heading_color=”#1e73be” sub_heading_color=”#595959″ alignment=”left” main_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:700″ main_heading_style=”font-weight:700;” main_heading_font_size=”desktop:22px;” sub_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:500″ sub_heading_style=”font-weight:500;” sub_heading_font_size=”desktop:16px;” sub_heading_line_height=”desktop:18px;”]Schedule (Pay) Activities MUST include an appropriate level of detail. The schedule shall be the basis for measuring Contractor progress. Schedule activities will show the order in which the Contractor proposes to perform the work, the dates on which the contractor contemplates starting and completing salient features.

Sum of pay activities must equal the contract amount and be grouped by Contract Line Item (CLIN). Sum of all CLIN’s equals the contract amount. Each activity must include its relation to a specific Contractor or Subcontractor, Feature of Work, Phase, Project Area, and Work Category.

Lack of an approved Schedule of Activities will result in an inability of the Contracting Officer to review or approve progress for the purposes of payment. In a nutshell, if the schedule for Pay Activities is not done completely and correctly, the contractor may receive reduced pay or no pay at all until the next pay period.[/ultimate_heading][ultimate_heading main_heading=”6. Identify Contractor Responsibilities” main_heading_color=”#1e73be” sub_heading_color=”#595959″ alignment=”left” main_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:700″ main_heading_style=”font-weight:700;” main_heading_font_size=”desktop:22px;” sub_heading_font_family=”font_family:Roboto|font_call:Roboto|variant:500″ sub_heading_style=”font-weight:500;” sub_heading_font_size=”desktop:16px;” sub_heading_line_height=”desktop:18px;”]The Contractor is required to furnish a specified quality of construction, including materials and equipment to be incorporated in the work. Control of the quality of materials and equipment require timely review, testing, or other evaluation.

All required submittals must be made in time to allow for evaluation, approval, procurement, and delivery prior to the preparatory control phase and before the item is needed in the construction process. The primary responsibility for the overall management and control of contractor submittals lies with the Prime Contractor.

Staffing

It is the contractor’s responsibility to carefully examine the contract requirements for CQC and provide personnel capable of complying with the CQC requirements of the contract clauses and technical provisions.

The CQC staff

The Staff must be of sufficient size and have the qualifications necessary to ensure contract compliance, whether the prime contractor, subcontractors, or vendors, performs work.

The CQC System Manager

This position normally reports directly to the project superintendent or someone higher in the contractor’s organization. The size and composition of the CQC organization may vary as the job progresses. At all times it should be compatible with the level of effort and capability required by the contract and construction schedule.

Quality Control Plans and Procedures

Contractors will be required to prepare a quality control plan for all projects except those excluded under the discretionary authority.

Identify workers or potential workers who will be required to take training

The Corps of Engineers requires the Contractors’ Quality Control System Manager to complete the course entitled “Construction Quality Management for Contractors,” since 1994. The certificate obtained for successfully completing the training is good for five years.

As the certificates expire, those individuals will be required to retake the training. Once the Contractor has selected and designated a CQC System Manager. If working on a USACE Project, the The CQC System Manager will need to learn how to use the Resident Management System. Titan University Offers several courses on RMS.

The CQC System Manager and staff will be required to read and become familiar with the Quality Control System (QCS)

Identify Qualified Schedule Representative

The Contractor shall designate an authorized representative who shall be responsible for preparation of all required schedule reports. Specific qualifications are listed in the project specifications. Once the representative has been selected and approved the Resident Engineer will schedule and conduct hands-on training on the use of the Standard Data Exchange of schedule information to the QCS Software.[/ultimate_heading][vc_separator color=”blue” style=”dashed” border_width=”3″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1636648233802{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width: 1px !important;background-color: #e5e5e5 !important;}”]

This concludes Module 1 of the Quality Control Planning Course. Please take the quiz now. Once you’ve finished, meet us over in the final Module 2. Good luck on the quiz!

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